NEWSLETTER OF THE INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOHISTORICAL ASSOCIATION

SPRING 2024

Volume 43, No. 1

Inna Rozentsvit, Editor

Dear All,

This issue of the Psychohistory News is dedicated to the IPhA’s 47th Annual Conference, its plenary speakers, panelists, and individual presenters.

Everyone registered for this event will receive the Zoom link the day before the conference.

The schedule of the conference is available online at https://psychohistory.us/conference/

Please note that the schedule is being updated still, and if you do not see the updates at the moment, please refresh the page.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. An Invitation to the IPhA’s 2024 Annual Conference on HOPES and FEARS for OUR POLARIZED WORLD: PSYCHOHISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES
  2. Meet Our Plenary Speakers: Their Topics, Abstracts, Bios
    Regine Scholz: COMMUNICATION IN TIMES OF SOCIETAL CONFLICT
    Anne Speckhard: PSYCHOSOCIAL ASPECTS OF RADICALIZATION INTO WHITE SUPREMACY, ANTI-GOVERNMENT MILITIA, INCEL AND MILITANT JIHADIST MOVEMENTS AND GROUPS
    Robin Grille: THE NEW FASCISM: SOCIAL DEVOLUTION – OR GROWTH-PANIC?
    Sheldon Solomon: (UN)TRUTH AND TOTALITARIANISM
  3. Meet Our Individual and Panel Presenters on Friday, May 31st, 2024: Their Topics, Abstracts, Bios
    Robert Gordon: Measuring the Mental Functioning of Putin, Trump, and Zelenskyy (individual presentation)
    J. I. ‘Hans’ Bakker: Trump, Legitimate Authority, and Authoritarianism: Max Weber’s Ideal Type Models (individual presentation)
    Inna Rozentsvit: Neurobiology Tools for Fostering Post-traumatic Growth and Cultivating Global Peace (individual presentation)
    Howard Stein: Some Contributions of Applied Psychohistorical Poetry to Imagining, Understanding, Facilitating Healing in the Shadow of Hopes and Fears in Our Polarized World (individual presentation)
    Jeffrey Rubin: The Evil that Men Do: Psychoanalytic Meditations on Wickedness (individual presentation)
    Jon Mills: The Evil that Men Do: The Inevitability of Prejudice (individual presentation)
    Francis Baudry: Freud and Marie Bonaparte Correspondence 1925-1939: An intimate relationship (individual presentation)
    Panel: FATHER DISILLUSIONMENT IN COURAGEOUS DAUGHTERS WHO INFLUENCE ART AND POLITICAL HEALTH: Psychodynamic and Psychohistorical Implications: Cassidy Hutchinson, Charlotte Bronte, and Suzanne Farrell
    Panel of the IPhA’S Roundtable Discussion Working Group: CARING FOR SELF AND OTHER IN A DESTRUCTIVE AND TRAUMA-FILLED WORLD
    Panel: ANTISEMITISM AS JEW-HATRED: A PSYCHOHISTORICAL ENIGMA – PANEL, PART 1
  4. Meet Our Individual and Panel Presenters on Saturday, June 1st, 2024: Their Topics, Abstracts, Bios
    Jerome Blackman: Rescue Fantasies, Splitting, Idealization, Inhibition of Critical Judgment, and Magical Parental Transferences to American Presidents as an Antidote to Fear (individual presentation)
    Richard Wood: Does Trump Fit a Model of Malignant Narcissism? (individual presentation)
    Ruth Lijtmaer: Strangers in Their Own Land: Where Is a Safe Place to Go? Displaced People Lost Everything and Have Nothing (individual presentation)
    Marc-André Cotton: Behaviorism and the Shaping of the American Mind (individual presentation)
    Jun Lu: Memory restoration: Working through Histories in the North American Chinese Diaspora (individual presentation)
    Charles Gourgey: Religious Roots of Islamic Antisemitism (individual presentation)
    Panel: PSYCHOHISTORICAL ASPECTS OF THE GLOBAL RISE OF THE RADICAL RIGHT AND AUTHORITARIAN POPULISM
    Panel: ANTISEMITISM AS JEW-HATRED: A PSYCHOHISTORICAL ENIGMA – PANEL, PART 2
    Panel: UNDERSTANDING THE UKRAINE WAR
    Panel: THE MANY ROADS TO PSYCHOBIOGRAPHY: A MULTIGENERATIONAL PANEL
  5. Meet Our Individual and Panel Presenters on Sunday, June 2nd, 2024: Their Topics, Abstracts, Bios
    Nina Cerfolio: Adolescent Domestic Mass School Shooting Sprees and the Need for Humane Parenting (individual presentation)
    Jerome Blackman: Superego Variations in Genocidal Leaders: Fanatics vs. Psychopaths (individual presentation)
    Brian D’Agostino: Death Anxiety in Our Polarized World: Introduction to Terror Management Theory (individual presentation)
    Panel: PSYCHOHISTORY FORUM PANEL: THE THREAT TO AMERICAN AND WORLD DEMOCRACIES IN LIGHT OF THE 2024 US ELECTION
    Panel: PARENTING AND PARENTHOOD THROUGH ATTACHMENT THEORY, TRANSGENERATIONAL TRANSMISSION OF TRAUMA, AND NEUROPSYCHOBIOLOGY LENS
    Panel: ANTISEMITISM AS JEW-HATRED: A PSYCHOHISTORICAL ENIGMA – PANEL, PART 3
    Panel: UNDERSTANDING RELIGION: PSYCHOHISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES
  6. Bulletin Board
  7. IPhA Business Meeting
  8. IPA Contacts

1.

HOPES and FEARS for OUR POLARIZED WORLD: PSYCHOHISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

INTERNATIONAL PSYCHOHISTORICAL ASSOCIATION’S
47th ANNUAL CONFERENCE
MAY 31st – June 2nd, 2024 (FRIDAY-SUNDAY)
VIRTUALLY ON ZOOM

HOPES and FEARS for OUR POLARIZED WORLD:
PSYCHOHISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

SUBTHEMES: PSYCHOHISTORICAL INSIGHTS ON

• WAR IN ISRAEL/PALESTINE AND UKRAINE
• DEATH ANXIETY AND TERROR MANAGEMENT THEORY
• ULTRANATIONALIST, FUNDAMENTALIST, AND OTHER AUTHORITARIAN MOVEMENTS
• 2024 US PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES AND CAMPAIGNS
• ROOTS OF ADULT PSYCHOPATHOLOGY IN CHILDHOOD TRAUMA
• PSYCHOANALYSIS, HUMANE PARENTING, AND INDIVIDUAL AND COLLECTIVE HEALING

Besides the themes and subthemes listed above, this year’s panels and individual presentations will cover a wide range of topics within the field of psychohistory, encompassing the intersection of history, psychology, psychoanalysis, and political psychology.

Whether you are exploring individual case studies, broader historical trends, or methodological innovations, we welcome diverse perspectives that contribute to the richness of our community’s intellectual dialogue.

We believe that your participation in the conference will not only enrich your own understanding, but also contribute to the collective knowledge and growth of our field.

Please hear the warm welcome from some of our plenary speakers here:

Invitation by Sheldon Solomon

Invitation by Robin Grille

Invitation by Anne Speckhard

There are more invitations by our individual presenters:

Invitation by Jon Mills

Invitation by Jeff Rubin

2.
MEET OUR PLENARY SPEAKERS: THEIR TOPICS, ABSTRACTS, BIOS

Learn more about this year’s invited speakers here:

Regine Scholz: COMMUNICATION IN TIMES OF SOCIETAL CONFLICT

Abstract: The presentation is going to muse on several topics.

First: What is societal regression? The transference of the term regression from the realm of the individual to that of society is debatable as the society does not have a body, that gives us the direction of development. Instead, we deal with the value decisions, when we describe certain behaviors as ‘regressive.’

Second: Leaving aside these fundamental theoretical objections for a moment, psychoanalytically informed people usually have – when referring to societal regression – some kind of ‘natural’ understanding of what is talked about: violence, killing, rape, torture, hatred, sadism, dehumanization, humiliation and despair.

Third: On the societal level, these phenomena are group processes, though carried out/ lived through by a large number of persons – collective traumata – have to be lived personally.

These processes can be best understood from the perspective of large group dynamics. Therefore, the lecture explores the interrelation with large group identity processes and asks for the communicational mechanisms, that make enable the necessary split between us and them – the precondition of what follows. Examples of inflammatory speech, of branding, framing and of non-verbal gestures are given. The impact of the connected strong emotions is discussed and the psychological dynamics that drive the dangerous spiral described. The remaining question is: How to stop it?

Bio: Regine Scholz, Dr. phil., studied psychology and sociology and holds a Ph.D. from Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, where she wrote the thesis “Culture and Collective Trauma – a Group Analytic Perspective.” Dr. Scholz’s professional experience includes research on mediation at Ruhr University Bochum and in-house management trainings in an internationally operating oil company. Since 1987 she has worked in private practice as a group analyst and psychotherapist, specializing in the treatment of trauma. Dr. Scholz was a member of the Management Committee of the GAS International (GASI) and founding member of the German Society for Group Analysis and Group Psychotherapy (D3G). She is a supervisor and training analyst of D3G as well as a member of the training staff of the Munster Institute of Therapeutic and Applied Group Analysis. She is a member of the editorial board of the journal group analysis.

Her work includes papers and workshops at international conferences on topics related to collective trauma. As Chair of the International Development Committee of GASI she organized the first three International Summer Schools in Group Analysis, in Belgrade 2013, in Prague 2015 and 2016 in Athens. She also is the co-organizer of the meanwhile five conferences on the heritage of Auschwitz “Voices after Auschwitz.” A comprehensive list of Dr. Scholz’s publications on issues of large group theory and the influence of culture and collective trauma on unconscious processes is available on her personal website.

 

Anne Speckhard: PSYCHOSOCIAL ASPECTS OF RADICALIZATION INTO WHITE SUPREMACY, ANTI-GOVERNMENT MILITIA, INCEL AND MILITANT JIHADIST MOVEMENTS AND GROUPS

Abstract: After conducting over 800 in-depth interviews with terrorists and close associates from militant jihadist, white supremacists, anti-government militia, and other groups, four key factors emerge as sufficient and necessary to make a terrorist/violent extremist. Speckhard’s model – the Lethal Cocktail of Terrorism will be discussed as well as the pathways into and backout of violent extremism and terrorism.

Bio: Anne Speckhard, Ph.D., is Director of the International Center for the Study of Violent Extremism (ICSVE) and served for over 2 decades as Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Georgetown University School of Medicine and also served as an Affiliate in the Center for Security Studies, Georgetown University. She has interviewed over 800 terrorists, violent extremists, their family members and supporters around the world, including in Western Europe, the Balkans, Central Asia, the Former Soviet Union and the Middle East. Over the past five years, she has conducted in-depth psychological interviews with 273 ISIS defectors, returnees, and prisoners, as well as 16 al Shabaab cadres (as well as family members and ideologues,) studying their trajectories into and out of terrorism, and their experiences inside ISIS and al Shabaab.

Speckhard developed the ICSVE Breaking the ISIS Brand Counter Narrative Project from these interviews, which includes over 250 short counter narrative videos that mimic ISIS recruitment videos but contain actual terrorists strongly denouncing ISIS as un-Islamic, corrupt and brutal. These videos have been utilized in over 200 Facebook and Instagram campaigns globally. Beginning in 2020, she launched the ICSVE Escape Hate Counter Narrative Project, interviewing dozens of white supremacists and members of hate groups, developing counternarratives from their interviews, and creating anti-recruitment videos. She has also conducted rare interviews with five Antifa activists (Antifa protestors rarely grant interviews.)

Dr. Speckhard is also an expert in rehabilitation and repatriation of terrorists and their families. In 2007, she designed the psychological and Islamic aspects of the Detainee Rehabilitation Program in Iraq to be applied to 20,000+ detainees and 800 juveniles. This work led to consulting with foreign governments on issues of terrorist prevention, interventions and repatriation, and the rehabilitation and reintegration of ISIS foreign fighters, wives and children. She has worked with NATO, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), UN Women, United Nations Countering Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate (UNCTED), United Nations Office of Drug and Crime (UNODC), the EU Commission and EU Parliament, and to the U.S. Senate & House, Departments of State, Defense, Justice, Homeland Security, Health & Human Services, and the FBI.

Today Dr. Speckhard actively trains key stakeholders in law enforcement, intelligence, elite hostage negotiation teams, educators, and other professionals in countering violent extremism, locally and internationally. Her focus is on the psychology of terrorism, the effective use of counter-narrative messaging materials produced by ICSVE, as well as studying the use of children as violent actors by groups such as ISIS. Her consultations and trainings include U.S., Canadian, German, British, Dutch, Austrian, Swiss, Belgian, Danish, Iraqi, Syrian, Jordanian and Thai national police and security officials, among others.

Dr. Speckhard is the author of five books: Homegrown HateTalking to TerroristsBride of ISISUndercover Jihadi; and ISIS Defectors: Inside Stories of the Terrorist Caliphate. She has appeared on CNN, BBC, NPR, Fox News, MSNBC, CTV, CBC, and in the New York TimesWashington PostLondon Times, TIME Magazine, NewsweekDaily Beast and more. She regularly writes a column for Homeland Security Today. Her research has been published in Global Security: Health, Science and PolicyBehavioral Sciences of Terrorism and Political AggressionJournal of African Security, Journal of Strategic Security, the Journal of Human SecurityBidhaan: An International Journal of Somali StudiesJournal for Deradicalization, Perspectives on Terrorism and the International Studies Journal.  Her academic publications are found at https://georgetown.academia.edu/AnneSpeckhard and www.icsve.org.

ICSVE’s Breaking the ISIS Brand and Escape Hate Counternarrative videos and training seminars can be watched on ICSVE’s YouTube channel. ICSVE’s research has been funded by the EU Commission; U.S. Departments of State, Homeland Security, Defense and Justice; UN Women; and the Embassy of Qatar.

 

Robin Grille: THE NEW FASCISM: SOCIAL DEVOLUTION – OR GROWTH-PANIC?

Abstract: In recent years we have seen wave after wave of backlash – often violent – against revolutionary social transformations (in gender dynamics especially) and an inexorable growth of globalism and multiculturalism. It seems these forces of social transformation have been met by an almost equal and opposite fervor for conservatism. What are the perceived existential threats to group-identity, and how can we better understand the despair that drives this backlash around the world? Rather than a sociological frame, I wish to apply a psychological – in particular, developmental – frame for understanding this worrisome phenomenon.

Looking more deeply: why do so many of us tenaciously attach to and defend an identity, social, tribal, or national, at times more dearly than our very lives? What might be the childhood roots of identitarian politics, and egoic attachments to ethnicity, nationality, and authoritarianism?

What are the authoritarian parenting and education practices most likely to produce hostile social and political conservatism, and how might we combat these trends through more life-affirming, healthier social policy initiatives and childrearing reforms?

Bio: Robin Grille, BA (psych), Grad Dip Counseling, Dip Int Psych, MAPS is an international speaker, psychologist/psychotherapist, and parenting educator. His articles on parenting and child development have been widely published and translated in Australia and around the world (including in the Journal of Psychohistory). Robin is the author of three books: Parenting for a Peaceful WorldHeart to Heart Parenting, and his newest title: Inner Child Journeys.

Born in Uruguay to Jewish-Romanian parents before coming to Australia when he was 10 years old, Robin has a lifetime fascination with how our diverse cultural norms shape the way we relate to the world. Part psychologist, part historian and part anthropologist, Robin’s work is animated by his belief that humanity’s future is largely dependent on the way we collectively relate to our children.

Being an inveterate traveler and global citizen, Robin’s keynotes and workshops have helped many people – throughout Asia, North America, UK, Australia and New Zealand – to embrace parenting as a transformative, personal growth journey. Drawing from over 30 years’ clinical experience and from leading-edge neuropsychological research, Robin’s seminars and courses focus on healthy emotional development for children as well as parents; while building supportive, co-operative parenting communities.

To find out more about Robin Grille’s work, his books, articles, and seminars, visit robingrille.com

 

Sheldon Solomon: (UN)TRUTH AND TOTALITARIANISM

Abstract: In this presentation Dr. Solomon will explore: the central role of untruth in fascism; psychological factors contributing to devotion to charismatic/populist leaders and their “big lies”; how social media in the 21st century magnifies untruths and amplifies psychological affinity for big liars; the grave danger this poses to democracy; and the role of “radical mindfulness” to offset these pernicious tendencies.

The result of a consistent and total substitution of lies for factual truth is not that the lie will now be accepted as truth and truth be defamed as a lie, but that the sense by which we take our bearings in the real world—and the category of truth versus falsehood is among the mental means to this end—is being destroyed.” Hannah Arendt, The Origin of Totalitarianism, 1951

Bio: Sheldon Solomon, PhD, is an American social psychologist. He is a professor of psychology at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York. His studies of the effects of the uniquely human awareness of death on behavior have been supported by the National Science Foundation and Ernest Becker Foundation and were featured in the award-winning documentary film Flight from Death: The Quest for Immortality. He is co-author of In the Wake of 9/11: The Psychology of Terror and The Worm at the Core: On the Role of Death in Life. Sheldon is an American Psychological Society Fellow, and a recipient of an American Psychological Association Presidential Citation (2007), a Lifetime Career Award by the International Society for Self and Identity (2009), the Association of Graduate Liberal Studies Programs Annual Faculty Award (2011), and a Career Contribution Award by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (2021).

3.
MEET OUR INDIVIDUAL AND PANEL PRESENTERS ON FRIDAY, MAY 31ST, 2024: THEIR TOPICS, ABSTRACTS, BIOS

On Friday, besides our two plenary speakers, Regine Scholz and Anne Speckhard, you will have an opportunity to meet other speakers and to engage with and contribute to the following individual presentations:

Robert Gordon: Measuring the Mental Functioning of Putin, Trump, and Zelenskyy (9am EDT, Room 2)

Abstract: History informs us that the malignant mental illness of autocratic leaders causes the worst avoidable suffering.  It is the duty of experts to educate and warn of such dangers. One objective way to do so is to consider a person’s capacity for mature leadership by assessing: weighting evidence, insightfulness, communication skills, making rational decisions, being realistic, high stress tolerance, resiliency and adaptation, good impulse control, and healthy standards and ideals. The Psychodiagnostic Chart (PDC-2) is the assessment tool of the Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual (PDM-2). The PDC-2’s Mental Functioning scales were used in this study since they show a high degree of utility for measuring these mental traits and are useful for informing the voting public.

To test the utility of the Mental Function scales we used a purposive group of 50 mental health experts to rate Vladimir Putin, Donald Trump and Volodymyr Zelenskyy. This study demonstrated that the PDC-2’s Mental Functioning scale was sensitive to both large and subtle differences in these political leaders. The Mental Functioning scale measured Volodymyr Zelenskyy with an over-all percentage of 91%. This indicates a psychologically healthy leader. Vladimir Putin’s average score was 41 % which is in the severe mental illness range. Donald Trump was rated at the 25% level of Mental Functioning or in the severe mental illness range. Putin and Trump both scored in the dangerous range in all 12 Mental Functions.

Robert M. Gordon PhD, ABPP, is a licensed psychologist and a Diplomate of Clinical Psychology and a Diplomate of Psychoanalysis and served on the governing council of the American Psychological Association. He was president of the Pennsylvania Psychological Association and received its Distinguished Service Award. He was elected Honorary Member of the American Psychoanalytic Association. He authored many scholarly articles and books in the areas of ethics, the MMPI-2, psychotherapy, relationships, forensic psychology, personality assessment, diagnoses, the Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual, a PDM-2 editor and researcher, and co-author of the Psychodiagnostic Chart. Dr. Gordon is rated by ResearchGate as a top researcher. He has an international consulting practice.

J. I. ‘Hans’ Bakker: Trump, Legitimate Authority, and Authoritarianism: Max Weber’s Ideal Type Models (9am EDT, Room 3)

Abstract: The MAGA right would like to go back to a neo-fascist, authoritarian model. But we can improve on those labels and frame the discussion in terms of Max Weber’s Ideal Type Models (ITMs). The paradox is that Trumpists want to both retain rights as “citizens” but at the same time they would like to have a traditional, pre-modern, pseudo-biblical King. Weber’s theories concerning “authoritarianism” involve a Comparative Historical Sociological (CHS) analysis of “legitimate authority”. King David had legitimate authority because YHWH (haShem, Adonai, El) deemed it so, at least according to Tanakh. Evangelicals ignore the O.T. rules, but nevertheless want to have a Biblical monarchy. The ITM of Patrimonial prebendalism puts journalistic use of various labels into a more scholarly framework. MAGA voters want to be able to vote. But once they have voted for DJT’s third term, all bets are off. They do not view People of Color (PoC) as true “peers.” It is almost as if Magna Carta (of 1225, not 1215) and events of 1688-89 and 1775-1791 had never happened. Mike Johnson, the Speaker of the House, wants to be in Congress but deny the legitimate authority of the Congress. Ultra-chauvinist nationalists are not patriotic. The deep psychoanalytic and psychohistorical roots are similar for many people in many parts of the world today (e.g., Russia, China, Hungary, North Korea, Venezuela, Myanmar). The idea of fortress America (at least for the “continental” states) reflects the deep fears of losing that which seems to give life ultimate meaning: a romanticized version of a kind of “American Jesus” not found in the New Testament, much less the whole Bible. Parallels with fascism in Italy, Germany and Japan are fairly clear. But many think “American exceptionalism” will save us (even in Canada).

I. (Hans) Bakker, PhD, is a retired Professor of Sociogy and Anthropology who has edited eleven books on various topics, including food security and the global urban-rural matrix. His books about Gandhi are based on a Jimmy Carter inspired internship in human rights in India. He has more than 100 published articles and many encyclopedia entries and book reviews. During his sabbatical at Harvard’s Judge Baker Children’s Center (JBCC) he had weekly sessions with the psychiatist Stuart Hauser, President of the JBCC.

Inna Rozentsvit: Neurobiology Tools for Fostering Post-traumatic Growth and Cultivating Global Peace (9am EDT, Room 1)

Abstract: What is psychological trauma? It is when our life assumptions are crashed. These assumptions, the scaffolding of our well-being, are: 1) the world is benevolent; 2) the world is meaningful, controllable, predictable, and just (and we are invulnerable); and 3) we are worthy, decent, and “good” people who deserve the “good” happening to us.  (Stephen Joseph)

What is post-traumatic growth (PTG)? In her 3-minute 2010 TED talk, “The best gift I ever survived”, Stacey Kramer, brain cancer survivor, said: “So next time you’re faced with something that’s unexpected, unwanted and uncertain, consider that it just may be a gift.” In Psycho-Neuro-Bio language, it is PTG.

In this presentation, we will employ the neurobiological lens to examine trauma, PTSD, and PTG, as well as we will learn the psycho-neuro-biological tools to foster Post-Traumatic Growth and cultivating peace, on individual and global scale.

Inna Rozentsvit, MD, PhD, MBA, MSciEd, is a physician-neurologist and neurorehabilitation specialist trained in psychoanalysis and psychotherapy, with extensive experience in brain injury, autoimmune neurological and neuropsychiatric conditions, and rehabilitation. Inna Rozentsvit is the Programs Director at the Object Relations Institute for Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis, where she teaches courses on neuropsychoanalysis and transdisciplinary approach to mental health. She is Associate Editor of Clio’s Psyche; Associate Director of the Psychohistory Forum; Group Co-Leader of the Psychobiography Research and Publication Group of the Psychohistory Forum.

Howard Stein: Some Contributions of Applied Psychohistorical Poetry to Imagining, Understanding, Facilitating Healing in the Shadow of Hopes and Fears in Our Polarized World (1pm EDT, Room 2)

Abstract: Through condensed expression, description, evocation, allusion, imagery, symbolism, metaphor, alliteration, rhyme and other poetic approaches, the idiom of applied poetry is proposed to be an essential instrument of psychohistorical understanding and even healing of the chasms of polarizing psychodynamic and political splits driven by individual, group, and intergroup’s hopes and fears. Hope and fear have been the subjects of poets’ creativity for centuries.  Applied psychohistorical poetry immerses a reader and listener at once in the inner world of the poet, the poem itself, and the reawakened memories, emotions, and stories in people who hear poetry’s sounds and see its texts. In this way, unconsciously rooted imagination and fantasy are a bridge to lived psychohistorical reality.

Complementing traditional psychohistorical methods, applied poetry deepens and opens us to levels of lived psychohistorical reality that narrative, linear scholarship often lacks. It facilitates inner, interpersonal, and intergroup dialogue. Perhaps it also offers access to some of the “Why?” of psychohistory in addressing this IPhA conference’s theme. The presenter will read, discuss, and facilitate discussion of applied poetry, most of which is his own, that (1) attempts to help the reader/listener enter into a split apart world you cannot make up; (2) helps make sense (interpretation, explanation) of that lived experience and evoke the reader/listener’s own life stories; and (3) promote healing of the dangerous rifts binarism inflicts upon us all.

Howard F. Stein, PhD, is Professor Emeritus, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK. He is a poet, an applied anthropologist, a psychoanalytic anthropologist, medical anthropologist, an organizational anthropologist, and psychohistorian. He is Poet Laureate of the High Plains Society for Applied Anthropology, and the Psychohistorical Poet Laureate. He is the author of more than 30 books of poetry and prose, incl. Listening Deeply: An Approach to Understanding and Consulting in Organizational CultureBeneath the Crust of Culture: Psychoanalytic Anthropology and the Cultural Unconscious in American LifeCentre and Circumference: A Collection of Poems, and others. He can be reached at 

Jeffrey Rubin: The Evil that Men Do: Psychoanalytic Meditations on Wickedness (2:05 pm EDT, Room 4)

See video from Jeffrey Rubin on YouTube

Abstract: Evil simultaneously commands our attention and resists our comprehension. Philosophers and theologians, dramatists and political theorists, psychoanalysts and anthropologists have struggled to elucidate the nature of wickedness. But the nature of evil seems to elude human comprehension and raise more questions than answers. In this presentation, I explore a plurality of forms and sources of evil, as well as briefly draw on Herman Melville and William Shakespeare in order to gain hints about how to respond to this baffling and troubling dimension of human life.

Jeffrey B. Rubin, PhD, practices psychoanalysis in New York and Northern Westchester. He is the author of six books, and he teaches at various psychoanalytic institutions.

Jon Mills: The Evil that Men Do: The Inevitability of Prejudice (3:10pm EDT, Room 4)

See video from Jon Mills on YouTube

Abstract: Throughout this presentation, I will endeavor to introduce a speculative account of the future of humanity based on a discernable pattern of violence and exploitation of the Other that characterizes human motivation and deed. I shall be concerned with a narrow scope of questions that investigate whether our pathological propensities as a human race will likely bring about our extinction, or whether we can transmogrify our destructive impulses through the relational negotiation of collective valuation practices that transcend our more primal constitutions.

Will the fate of civilization succumb to sordid desire inspiring our demise, or will human accord triumph in the end?  The real issue involves: To what degree will the will toward violence be sublimated into the higher tiers of self-conscious ethical reflection that reason can afford?   We are a world divided by race, religion, ethnicity, economics, politics, and culture, where strong emotional bonds fuel and sustain separation and difference among our communities.  I do not wish to express platitudes, illusory ideals, or provide false hope — the evidence, the brute facticity of impoverishment, suffering, cruelty, and murder — points to the most archaic configurations of psychic development that permeate our valuation practices.  When collective identity is so firmly established in bipolar relation to the Other, is it possible for such valuation practices to abate under the rubric of peace?  Prejudice, hate, and violence are no more likely to disappear than the reality of the external world, therefore the question becomes one of amelioration.

Jon Mills, PsyD, PhD, ABPP is a philosopher, psychoanalyst, and clinical psychologist.  He is Honorary Professor, Department of Psychosocial & Psychoanalytic Studies, University of Essex, UK, on Faculty in the Postgraduate Programs in Psychoanalysis & Psychotherapy, Adelphi University, USA, and on Faculty and is a Supervising Analyst at the New School for Existential Psychoanalysis, USA.  Recipient of numerous awards for his scholarship including 5 Gradiva® Awards, he is the author and/or editor of over 30 books in psychoanalysis, philosophy, psychology, and cultural studies. In 2015 he was given the Otto Weininger Memorial Award for Lifetime Achievement by the Canadian Psychological Association.

Francis Baudry: Freud and Marie Bonaparte Correspondence 1925-1939: An intimate relationship (3:10pm EDT, Room 1)

Abstract: This presentation will explore an extraordinary view of the complex mixture of personal and professional relationships, involving mutual acting out. Periodic analysis in Vienna complemented by an affair and an analysis of Marie Bonaparte, a Greek princess, by Rudolph Loewenstein, who, for Marie Bonaparte, was a substitute for both Freud (she addressed the latter as mon cher pere) and for her beloved father, who died 2 years previously.

Francis Baudry, M.D., is a distinguished psychiatrist with over 60 years of clinical experience. He is a Training and Supervising Analyst at New York Psychoanalytic Society & Institute. His special interests include a wide range of analytic theories: Kleinian, French (especially the work of André Green), and South American. Dr. Baudry has written on a wide variety of topics including subjectivity, character supervision, and applied analysis.

_____________________________

Also, on Friday, May 31st, 2024, we will have the following PANEL PRESENTATIONS:

FATHER DISILLUSIONMENT IN COURAGEOUS DAUGHTERS WHO INFLUENCE ART AND POLITICAL HEALTH: Psychodynamic and Psychohistorical Implications: Cassidy Hutchinson, Charlotte Bronte, and Suzanne Farrell
• Susan Kavaler-Adler
(Presenter) • Ken Fuchsman (Discussant) (1pm – 3:05pm EDT, Room 1)

Abstract: Cassidy Hutchinson, the heroine of truth telling on the January 6th committee, illustrates the psychological courage related to a capacity to survive father disillusionment, and father figure disillusionment.  Her memoir illustrates the same history of mother adequacy, father failure, and transformation through mournful disillusionment to admirable character development as do the stories of the British literary author, Charlotte Bronte, and the iconic prima ballerina of the Balanchine New York City Ballet, Suzanne Farrell.

This character development had powerful effects on the culture of their times, and on the psychohistorical evolution of each culture.  In contrast, other women artists, and writers, such as Emily Bronte, Emily Dickinson, Virginia Woolf, Sylvia Plath, Diane Arbus, and Anne Sexton have traumatic failures in primal mothering that prevent the successful mourning (Developmental Mourning) of father disillusionment, resulting in reclusive withdrawal from life, or in suicidal acting out, as opposed to an evolution towards life and relationship development. Individual psychological capacities for mourning personal father disappointment/ disillusionment/loss can manifest in societal contributions, which profoundly affect the culture of their times. Psychohistory reflects the developmental mourning of each individual woman who shares her personal growth with others through art or through critical public concerns.

Susan Kavaler-Adler, PhD, ABPP, D.Litt., NCPsyA, is a clinical psychologist and psychoanalyst who has been in private practice for 48 years. She is the Founder and Executive Director of the Object Relations Institute for Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis, and a President of the Board, senior supervisor, active faculty, and a training analyst.

Dr. Kavaler-Adler is a Fellow of the American Board and Academy of Psychoanalysis. She is the author of 7 published books and 70 articles, and has received 16 awards for her writing, including the Gradiva® Award from NAAP and 3 Gradiva® nominations. She is internationally known as both an author and public speaker and has given presentations in London and Seoul. Her early books on iconic women writers and artists, were followed by books on the theory of clinical practice with in-depth studies. Her latest book, Developmental Mourning, Erotic Transference, and Object Relations Psychoanalysis (IP Books, 2022) is the first of three volumes of her Selected Papers.

Ken Fuchsman, Ed.D., is past President of the International Psychohistorical Association, past content editor of the Psychohistory News, and Emeritus faculty and administrator at the University of Connecticut. He is a co-editor and the author of a few books – the latest one is Movies, Rock & Roll, Freud: Essays on Film and Music (MindMend Publishing, 2021).

PANEL OF THE IPHA’S ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION WORKING GROUP CARING FOR SELF AND OTHER IN A DESTRUCTIVE AND TRAUMA-FILLED WORLD (2:05pm – 4:10pm EDT, Room 2)

Panelists: Rose Gupta, Gabriela Gusita, Inna Rosentvit (organizer), Claire Steinberg (moderator)

Panel’s Abstract: This group explores the complexity of caring, where experience of caregiving and caretaking offers unconscious and conscious meaning-making and unique opportunity for fantasy, dreamwork and enactment possibility. Participants discuss unexpected elements of psychic growth and development found in confrontation with lifecycle transitions and processes of aging, illness, and death in a disruptive trauma-fueled environment.

Discussants share personal and therapeutic narratives, emphasizing commonalities and differences and the wide diversity of bio-social-emotional states: solitude and relational holding, isolation and despair, and burden, rage, and gratitude. The panel incorporates the interplay of time with individual, familial, therapeutic, neurobiological, and broad communal concerns. The audience will be invited to participate.

Claire B. Steinberger: Acts of Caring: A Complex Journey (2:05pm – 3:05pm EDT, Room 2)

Abstract: The first segment of this presentation, “Acts of Caring: Going Beyond,” explores acts of caring in the context of love, duty, and the human capacity for moving beyond the expectable.

The second segment, “Dreamland: Empathic Failure,” presents a clinical vignette highlighting developmental struggles that impede the capacity for receiving and giving care.

Claire B. Steinberger, PhD is Supervisory School Psychologist, Senior Faculty, National Psychological Association for Psychoanalysis, Supervisory Member, American Association Marriage and Family Therapy, New York Mediator, Adjunct Associate Professor Long Island University, City University of New York. Her research and presentations focus on trauma and emphasize a multi-disciplinary approach, integrating individual, interpersonal and cultural interface. Dr. Steinberger is a member of multiple organizations that implement such approach: International Psychohistorical Association, American Psychological Association, and American Psychoanalytic Association. She is in private practice in New York and New Jersey.

Gabriela Gusita: The Mutuality of Care (2:05pm – 3:05pm EDT, Room 2)

Abstract: My paper is an expression of gratitude to my clients and colleagues, who “took care” of me during a difficult moment of my professional life as a therapist and that is the suicide of a client. I would like to propose the importance of the care we receive from our clients who manage at times to go beyond their pain and stay by our side unconsciously giving us the symbolic hug of recognition we need so much when we, the therapists, are hurt. Our clients receive acknowledgement for caring without knowing the whole truth.

Gabriela Gusita, MSci, is a psychologist, trained in Relational Psychoanalysis, in private practice in Athens, Greece. She serves as a Forensic Psychologist for the Athens Court of Justice, and she is an active member and co-founder of three Study Groups on Ferenczi’s Work. Member of the International Forum on Violence. Participant at local and international conferences and seminars focused on the violent environment of trauma, the identity of the therapist, and the mutuality of emotions in therapy.

Rose Gupta: Negation Trauma and the collapse of empathy (3:10pm – 4:10pm EDT, Room 2)

Abstract: In this section, I take up the concept of Negation Trauma from an intersubjective perspective; that is, the encounter between two subjects. I will discuss negation trauma as being the intent to destroy, annihilate, reduce to a thing another person’s subjectivity. I will describe the intrapsychic impact on the mind when internalizing the annihilating other. We will discuss the consequences of intrapsychic negation trauma projected onto our interpersonal world.

Rose Gupta, PsyD, LCSW, is a psychoanalyst, clinical social worker, instructor, international speaker, and consultant in private practice in San Francisco. Her papers include “Left Too Long: The Disappearing Analyst”; “When the Mind Does Not Arrive”; “Thinking About Trauma, Finding Frankenstein”; “The Frankenstein Metaphor”; “Estranged from Oneself,” with a focus on negation trauma, intersubjectivity and unrepresented states.

Inna Rozentsvit: The Why’s of Care-Giving and Care-Receiving, and the Meaning of Life (3:10pm – 4:10pm EDT, Room 2)

Abstract: Caregiving is becoming the “new norm” in America. Why do people become caregivers? What motivates them? How care-giving relates to self-care and care-receiving? I will explore the neurobiology of caregiving, of self-care, as well as my family’s and my own relationship with both.

Inna Rosentsvit, MD, Ph.D, MSci, is a physician-neurologist and neurorehabilitstion specialist trained in psychoanalysis and psychotherapy, with extensive experience in brain injury, autoimmune neurological and neuropsychiatric conditions, and rehabilitation. She is Associate Editor of Clio’s Psyche; Associate Director of the Psychohistory Forum; Group Co-Leader of the Psychobiography Research and Publication Group of the Forum.

ANTISEMITISM AS JEW-HATRED: A PSYCHOHISTORICAL ENIGMA – PANEL, PART 1 (1pm – 4:10pm EDT, Room 3)

Abstract: Antisemitism as prejudice and discrimination against Jewish individuals and communities, a deeply troubling phenomenon, has existed since ancient times while constantly changing its expressions.

There are 11 panelists presenting in this panel, which spans over three days of the conference. The panelists will attempt to examine the psychoanalytic and psychohistorical contexts of antisemitism, old and new, which is crucial in combating it as well as fostering a more inclusive and tolerant world.

Inna Rozentsvit (panel organizer): Intro to the topic: Antisemitism as Jew-Hatred: A Psychohistorical Enigma (1pm – 2pm EDT, Room 3)

Abstract: Antisemitism as prejudice and discrimination against Jewish individuals and communities, a deeply troubling phenomenon, has existed since ancient times while constantly changing its expressions. This presentation is an introduction to the panel that will attempt to examine the psychoanalytic and psychohistorical contexts of antisemitism, which is crucial in combating it as well as fostering a more inclusive and tolerant world.

Inna Rozentsvit, M.D., PhD, MSciEd, is a physician-neurologist, neurorehabilitation specialist, psychoanalyst, publisher, neuropsychoeducator, and medical and psychohistorical researcher. She is the Founder of the Neurorecovery Solutions, a non-profit organization that helps neurologically impaired and their families, and the Programs Director at the Object Relations Institute for Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis, where she teaches courses on Neuropsychoanalysis and Functional PsychoNeuroBiology. Dr. Rozentsvit is an Associate Director of Psychohistory Forum and an Associate Editor of Clio’s Psyche, a psychohistorical publication.

Julie R. Ancis: The Psychology Profession: Present-Day Manifestations of Hate (1pm – 2pm EDT, Room 3)

Abstract: This presentation will provide an overview of present-day antisemitism within major professional psychology and counseling associations. The spread, prevalence, and impact of antisemitism within these associations on attitudes and practices will be discussed. The presenter will provide specific examples of the failure to address such hate as well as potential causes. Implications for education, training, and practice will be addressed.

Julie R. Ancis, PhD, ABPP, is a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Informatics and Founding Director of the Cyberpsychology Program at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. Dr. Ancis is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (Divisions 17, 35, and 46). She is a PI or Co-PI in over $6M in grant funding including from the DOE, NSF, and AEN. Dr. Ancis’s extensive scholarly publications include 4 books, approximately 80 journal articles, book chapters, and technical reports; and over 200 professional presentations focused on cyberpsychology, diversity, multicultural competence, the legal system, and human-computer interaction.

Robert M. Prince / Ian Miller (discussant): The Perfect Crime: The Murder of Reality (2:05pm – 3:05pm EDT, Room 3)

Abstract: The title of this presentation is intended to convey that antisemitism can be described as a perfect crime. First guilt is precluded because its salient psychological and social characteristic is self-righteousness. Each act of persecution is justified as virtuous. Paradigmatically the Nazis saw themselves as improving and protecting the human race. The criminals were those who interfered with the antisemitic project. Antisemitic acts were exempt from civil laws that would otherwise prosecute them; the failure to persecute Jews was the crime. The antisemite always constructs evidence justifying the crime; no examination is permitted, the “evidence” is incontrovertible. In other words, the perfect crime is also the perfect frame up, the victim is the perpetrator.  Antisemitism operates despite and counter to reality as a basic state of mind involving projections, contradictions, dissociations, and enduring psychic polarities. Attributions to Jews over millennia are embedded in religion and philosophy, but going deeper, are essential fantasy constructed out of psychic material and disordered thought processes. Beyond a way of understanding the world and a way of understanding the self, antisemitism expresses the basic concerns of a given culture, it also provides a way of belonging and the most bizarre constructions serve to confirm group membership. Ultimately, antisemitism does not even require the existence of Jews.

Robert M. Prince, Ph.D., ABPP, is Clinical Associate Professor, New York University Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy & Psychoanalysis where he is also past co-chair of the Interpersonal Track. He is Past-President of Psychologist-Psychoanalyst Clinicians and an Associate Editor of The American Journal of Psychoanalysis. He is the author of over 45 articles and chapters. His books include The Legacy of the Holocaust and The Death of Psychoanalysis.

Charlotte Schwartz: Aggression and the Purpose of Antisemitism (3:10pm – 4:10pm EDT, Room 3)

Abstract: The author hopes to demonstrate how antisemitism has been utilized by various societies to discharge aggression in the form of hate to the “other,” and thus protect their indigenous populous from excessive harm. The Jew as the recipient of the negative aspects of the aggressive drive spares the dominant group from the murderous rage and hatred that is an inherent aspect of this biological drive. 

Charlotte Schwartz, MSS, LCSW, is a psychoanalyst in private practice in the Chicago area and is a supervisor of social work and has taught pediatrics and social work at New York Medical College, Smith College School for Social Work, and NYU School of Social Work and Hunter College School of Social Work.

Charlotte Schwartz is the author of Sex, Society and Relationships: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow and The Mythology Surrounding Freud and Klein: Implications for Psychoanalysis. She also published numerous articles related to psychoanalytic theory and clinical work.

Antisemitism as Jew-Hatred: A Psychohistorical Enigma – Panel, Part 1General Discussion (Moderator: Daniel Burston) (3:10pm – 4:10pm EDT, Room 3)

4.
MEET OUR INDIVIDUAL AND PANEL PRESENTERS ON SATURDAY, JUNE 1ST, 2024: THEIR TOPICS, ABSTRACTS, BIOS

On Saturday, besides our two plenary speaker, Robin Grille you will have an opportunity to meet other speakers and to engage with and contribute to the following individual presentations:

Jerome Blackman: Rescue Fantasies, Splitting, Idealization, Inhibition of Critical Judgment, and Magical Parental Transferences to American Presidents as an Antidote to Fear (9am EDT, Room 1)

Abstract: In relation to the real fears of dastardly world leaders, who seem to appear in each generation, Americans have rallied around idealized presidents. This presentation examines some of the psychoanalytic understanding of how individuals and large groups respond to real fear. The responses can be realistic but can also involve several defensive operations regarding the President at the time of the danger. Splitting, idealization, and transferences are explicated as mechanisms and as they apply to Presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy, Nixon, and Carter. An earlier, abbreviated version of this presentation was made at the Psychohistory Forum.

Jerome S. Blackman, M.D., FIPA, is professor of clinical psychiatry at Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk; Training and Supervising Analyst with the Contemporary Freudian Society in Washington DC; Faculty member at the Object Relations Institute in New York, and invited lecturer at Icahn Mt Sinai School of Medicine, New York. He is past Distinguished Professor of Mental Health (2018 – 21) through Harvard – Shanxi Medical University in Taiyuan, China, twice past President of the Virginia Psychoanalytic society, and past President of the American College of psychoanalysts. His honors include the Edith Sabin MD award from the American Psychoanalytic Association.  he is the author of five books, including 101 Defenses: How the Mind Shield Itself (his first) and Developmental Evaluation of Children and Adolescents: A Psychodynamic Guide (co-author, 2023).

Richard Wood: Does Trump Fit a Model of Malignant Narcissism? (10:05am EDT, Room 1)

Abstract: In this presentation, Richard Wood will initially identify some of the most salient characteristics of malignant narcissism. As a propositional list, he would include: over-investment in strength; denial of weakness and vulnerability; destruction of others’ voice; compulsion to dominate and obliterate an opposing other; displacement of science and truth with fabricated realities; perceived self-interest that displaces empathy; personal contrivance rather than authenticity; and an inability to form deep, lasting, mutually respectful relationships based upon caring, sacrifice, and regard for the other rather than transactional value. The presenter will argue that these characteristics grow out of a personality built around a relentless grandiose self. The discussion will then focus upon provision of some examples that would seem to confirm the salient characteristics that were identified. At the end of the presentation, the emphasis will be made on such personality representing a significant danger to democracy.

Richard Wood, PhD, is a psychoanalytically oriented clinical psychologist based in Ontario, Canada, with over 45 years of experience. He was educated at Cornell University (undergraduate studies) and Wayne State University (graduate, PhD, studies). He served as a staff member, and then as Acting Director, of the Department of Psychology at Mount Sinai Hospital from 1974 to 1982. Dr. Wood was also an associate professor in the Department of Behavioral Sciences at the University of Toronto Medical School, from late 1970s through mid-1980s. Currently in private practice and semi-retired, Richard Wood writes, mostly on the topics of narcissism and malignant narcissism. His recent books include A Study of Malignant Narcissism: Personal and Professional Insights (Routledge, 2023) and Psychoanalytic Reflections on Vladimir Putin: The Cost of Malignant Leadership (Routledge, 2024).

Ruth Lijtmaer: Strangers in Their Own Land: Where Is a Safe Place to Go? Displaced People Lost Everything and Have Nothing (1pm EDT, Room 2)

Abstract: Tragically, in the recent wars (Ukraine and now Israel) people have been forced to flee their homes due to extreme, catastrophic conditions resulting from violence, and human rights violations.

They are displaced to unknown places where there is no comfort and basic necessities are not met. Seeing family members dying, women raped, children orphaned, created a desperation and lack of trust in governments as well as lack of faith in the future. The impact of these multiple losses (loss of home, family, community, culture, and social networks) is a traumatic experience. There is a reactivation of prior traumas, an apres-coup in the context of these current threats.

Ruth M. Lijtmaer, PhD, is a senior supervisor, training analyst and faculty at the Center for Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis of New Jersey. In private practice, Ridgewood, New Jersey. Board member of IFPE from 2015 to 2022. Now Co-Chair of the Social Responsibility Committee IFPE. She presents papers nationally and internationally as well as published articles and book chapters in topics like immigration, social responsibility, human rights violations, trauma, and race.

Marc-André Cotton: Behaviorism and the Shaping of the American Mind (2pm EDT, Room 1)

Abstract: Historically founded on animal experimentation, behaviorism made withdrawal of parental attention—or ‘time-out’—one of the instruments of its Parent management training programs. However, the question of the effectiveness, or even harmfulness of this measure is still being debated. The aim of this presentation is to take a closer look at the studies that behaviorists claim to justify ‘time-out’ for children. The possible side-effects of ‘time-out’ for children’s psycho-affective balance, and the evolution of its social acceptability will also be examined.

Marc-André Cotton, MA, is an independent scholar and advocate of children. With his late wife and therapist Sylvie Vermeulen, he is the founder of the French website Regard conscient, a research project whose purpose is to bring to light the links between repressed sufferings and their acting out on the different stages of life. He has published numerous articles on PH related topics, eventually serving as IPhA’s International Vice President since 2014. He regularly writes for French magazine PEPS, a quarterly dedicated to positive parenting, and lectures in parental education. He’s the author of “In the Name of the Father, the Bush Years” and the “Legacy of Violence in Childrearing,” published in French in 2014.

Jun Lu: Memory restoration: Working through Histories in the North American Chinese Diaspora (2pm EDT, Room 2)

Abstract: From the perspective of psychoanalytic theory, this presentation attempts to clarify the way and possibility of working through difficult histories in the Chinese diaspora in North America. Considering the discrete nature, fragmentation, mobility, and prevalence of individual and familial units within the diaspora, psychoanalysis provides an advantageous framework for investigating and addressing historical experiences and their aftermath.

Case studies will illustrate the utilization of cultural products from the Chinese diaspora as a means to comprehend their ongoing struggle between the processes of remembrance and forgetting. In my analysis, I consider not only the textual material itself, but also the factors pertaining to the authorship and reception of the text. These factors include situations of diaspora, traumatic experiences, the act of bearing witness, modes of learning, and the diligent endeavors of working through.

Jun Lu is a PhD, candidate in the Social and Political Thought program at York University, Canada. She is also a graduate associate at York Center for Asian Studies. Her research work focuses on large-scale phenomena and aims to deepen our understanding of the human condition and how we are affected by the past. She is trained in the Fundamental Psychoanalytic Perspective program at the Toronto Psychoanalytic Society and Institute. She is a member of Psychohistory Forum and audits multiple courses offered at the Object Relations Institute for Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis.

Charles Gourgey: Religious Roots of Islamic Antisemitism (2pm EDT, Room 3)

Abstract: One of the many factors behind the Middle East conflict, often overlooked, is an antisemitism that appears to pervade much of the Muslim world. This presentation will examine some of the roots of this antisemitism as reflected in early biographies that are part of the sunna (also spelled sunnah), the Islamic religious tradition. Parallels to Christian antisemitism will also be considered.

Charles Gourgey, PhD, is a retired clinical music therapist. He has published articles in various religious journals and maintains a website on Bible and practical theology at www.judeochristianity.org.

_____________________________

Also, on Saturday, June 1st, 2024, we will have the following PANEL PRESENTATIONS:

PANEL: PSYCHOHISTORICAL ASPECTS OF THE GLOBAL RISE OF THE RADICAL RIGHT AND AUTHORITARIAN POPULISM (9am – 12:10pm EDT, Room 2)
Panelists: Brigitte Demeure, Ken Fuchsman, Karyne Messina, Peter Petschauer, Kenneth Rasmussen (organizer)

Kenneth Rasmussen: Psychohistorical Reflections on Recent Developments Within Authoritarian Populism in the Global South: Brazil, Argentina, and India (9am – 10am EDT, Room 2)

Abstract: There is a need, given the recent global upsurge of the radical right and authoritarian populism, for psychohistorians today to both apply the insights of past scholarly analyses and to forge new insights to understand recent developments and trends within far-right extremism. Using both traditional psychological perspectives and those of contemporary psychoanalytic trauma research, this paper will provide a global overview of the psychic consequences of economic crisis, the COVID pandemic, increased immigration, internet-fueled fanatic ultranationalist and radical religious ideology, and the disruptive impact of the digital world of social media, in shaping specific political leaders and movements in Brazil, Argentina, and India. It will describe some broader psychohistorical themes and patterns that these nations now have in common with the US, Western Europe, and Russia, that increasingly characterize the global populist radical right.

Kenneth Rasmussen, PhD, PsyD, is an independent scholar with PhD in Modern History from UCLA and a practicing psychotherapist with a certificate in psychoanalytic psychotherapy.

Brigitte Demeure: Psychohistorical aspects of the rise of the far right in Germany and in France (9am – 10am EDT, Room 2)

Abstract: The rise of the far right and authoritarianism is the subject of different analyses in Germany and France. I will focus here on the research of the “Leipziger Autoritarismus Studien” who have been studying these phenomena for years, referring to the work of the Frankfurt School (T. W. Adorno, E. Fromm, others) and the work of French sociologists, including that of Jérôme Fourquet. The differences in approaches and their conclusions will be presented in this communication.

Brigitte Demeure, PhD, M2, has worked for many years in international trade, but also as a member of the board of various international solidarity NGO’s. She holds a master’s degree in intercultural negotiation, a PhD in history, is a qualified translator and author of the book “La figure maternelle dans la vie politique française, 1789-1914” (Editions Universitaires d’Avignon, 2023), and of many psychohistorical articles published in peer-reviewed journals in France, Germany, and the USA. She has received two awards by the ACOPSA (American College of Psychoanalysts) in the USA.

Karyne E. Messina Shattering the Mirror: Understanding Trump’s Behavior and Policies Through His Family History (10:05am – 11:05am EDT, Room 2)

Abstract: Donald Trump has a very real chance of winning the presidency in 2024, and Americans must understand that this man shows no remorse or regret for his actions that led to an insurrection on the Capitol on January 6, 2021. It appears Trump is willing to take his policies to an even darker place, particularly if we examine his rhetoric concerning immigrants, which has grown increasingly hostile, dehumanizing, and fascist. Rather than asking how we got to this point—that many Republicans are happy to potentially elect such a morally corrupt man to the presidency—I will consider why Donald Trump might be committed to continuing these practices. Why, for example, would he pursue policies that traumatize thousands of children fleeing poverty and dangerous living conditions in their home countries? The answer may lie in his own upbringing or, more specifically, in the backstory concerning his mother, Mary Ann Macleod, an immigrant who came to the United States in 1930 at the age of eighteen. This presentation will examine splitting and projective identification as these mechanisms relate to Donald Trump, which I wrote about in Aftermath: Healing from the Trump Presidency in 2020, https://www.freepsychotherapybooks.org/ebook/aftermath-healing-from-the-trump-presidency/

Karyne E. Messina, EdD, FABP, is the author of numerous books on projective identification, a podcast host, a licensed psychologist, and a certified psychoanalyst. She is also the Chair of the Scholarship and Writing section of the Department of Psychoanalytic Education (DPE) which is part of the American Psychoanalytic Association.

After completing her undergraduate studies at Florida Atlantic University, Dr. Messina earned a master’s and a doctoral degree from George Washington University. She completed her post-doctoral training at the Washington School of Psychiatry and the Washington Psychoanalytic Institute. Dr. Messina is currently on the medical staff of Suburban Hospital, which is part of Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Peter Petschauer: Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump (10:05am – 11:05am EDT, Room 2)

Abstract: This presentation traces key elements of Vladimir V. Putin’s rise power, attempts to control his own society and to nourish the dream of reacquiring territories lost after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. In order to attain the latter goal, he attempted first to ally himself with the West, but upon its recusal, he turned to China instead and is now its junior partner.
Possibly in revenge, or in attempt to undermine the West, he now offers his brand of radical conservatism to various Western countries. Donald Trump, one of his former business partners and an authoritarian ruler aspirant, is his main “target” and the American and his supporters are responding well to his overtures.

Bio: Peter Petschauer, PhD, Dhc.
Professor Emeritus, Appalachian State University.
Author and poet.
Recently published:
“Was man so Alles lernt. Südtiroler Rückhalt für die moderne Welt“ (“All the Things one Learns”), Weger, Brixen/Bressanone (2022);
“Listen to Rarely Heard Voices” a poetry book, New York City (2022);
“An Immigrant in the 1960s; Becoming an American in New York City” (2020);
“Hopes and Fears. Past and Present,” the first poetry book (2019);
Century Germany” and earlier books. Most available at peterpetschauer.com, or through amazon.com.

 

Ken Fuchsman: Donald Trump and the American Radical Right: Or Where Is Popular Support for Lawful Democracy When Needed? (11:10am – 12:10pm EDT, Room 2)

Abstract: Since the collapse of the USSR, many Americans on the right have found a new enemy, the supposedly Un-American Democratic Party. Donald Trump has given voice to these and other sentiments. Part of his support stems from that as an adult Donald Trump has often functioned outside the law. His career-long hostility to any infringements on his freedom is echoed in the sentiments of many of his supporters. Like him, many of Trump’s right-wing supporters exhibit little allegiance to civility, legalities, and constitutional government. Since his 2020 defeat, Trump has grown more bitter, conspiratorial, and furious. The American paranoid style has reached a new peak. This paper explores these extraordinary tendencies historically, biographically, and psychologically.

Bio: Ken Fuchsman, EdD, is co-editor with Michael Maccoby of a 2020 book on Donald Trump, author of Movies, Rock & Roll, Freud, and of Freud’s Inner Divisions. He is past President of the International Psychohistorical Association, past content editor of the Psychohistory News, and Emeritus faculty and administrator at the University of Connecticut.

Psychohistorical Aspects of the Global Rise of the Radical Right and Authoritarian Populism – General Discussion and Q&A (11:10am – 12:10pm EDT, Room 2)

 

ANTISEMITISM AS JEW-HATRED: A PSYCHOHISTORICAL ENIGMA – PANEL, PART 2 (10:05am – 12:10pm; then 1pm – 2pm EDT, Room 3)

Panel Abstract: Antisemitism as prejudice and discrimination against Jewish individuals and communities, a deeply troubling phenomenon, has existed since ancient times while constantly changing its expressions.

There are 11 panelists presenting in this panel, which spans over three days of the conference. The panelists will attempt to examine the psychoanalytic and psychohistorical contexts of antisemitism, old and new, which is crucial in combating it as well as fostering a more inclusive and tolerant world.

Susanne B. Seperson: Antisemitism and Identity: Theoretical Perspectives (10:05am – 11:05 am EDT, Room 3)

Abstract: This presentation explores how identity is socially constructed and negotiated as well as how the hated and haters’ identities are intertwined by reviewing sociological and psychological literature, relevant history, and biography.

Identity is both given and chosen. It matters how you see yourself and how others see you. It matters how you want to see yourself. One chooses to be an antisemite or not. We have a responsibility to remain true to our best possible self so that collectively we can have a positive impact. Although we can do this only one person at a time, collectively we influence the whole.  Antisemitism must never be permitted to be normalized. It will require the concerted effort of political, religious, and social media influencers to change the trajectory. Language, culture, and history demonstrate both the grip of the past and the possibilities of the future, including a decline in antisemitism. The choice is ours.

Susanne B. Seperson, PhD, represents Generations United, Washington, DC, a non-governmental organization at the United Nations.  She is the Vice Chair of the NGO Committee on Intergenerational Solidarity, a Substantive Committee of the Conference of Non-Governmental Organizations in Consultative Relationship with the United Nations and was the 2016 Co-Chair of the United Nations International Day of Older Persons. She is also the founding Chair of NGO Committee to End Antisemitism and Promote Peace, which was approved by CoNGO last year as an Affiliate Substantive Committee. Susanne was the Chair of the Long Island chapter of the New York State Intergenerational Network, and a Professor and Chair of the Department of Sociology at Dowling College, Oakdale, NY.

Jerome S. Blackman: Differential Diagnosis of Antisemitism, Based on Psychoanalytic Views of Prejudice (11:10am – 12:10 am EDT, Room 3)

Abstract: Freud addressed the problem of prejudice from a psychoanalytic standpoint many times in his career. Perhaps his most salient work is “group psychology and the analysis of the ego” (1920). Since then, there has been considerable literature concerning prejudicial ideas based on individual, group, and mass dynamics, including transgenerational transmission of trauma (e.g., Volkan). Geographical, political, historical, and economic factors can weigh into prejudicial ideas, however, this discussion will be limited to dynamic causes, as a contribution to how unconscious functioning can lead to the irrational states of mind commonly known as prejudice.

In this extemporaneous presentation, Dr. Blackman will review 21 different causes of prejudice based on individual dynamics. He will then review six causes based on group dynamics, another six based on massive group dynamics, and three curious etiologies that emanate from psychopathic propensities. In particular, he will look at how many of these concepts contribute to antisemitism. In the United States, and around the world, antisemitism has been confounded with anti-Zionism, so that the distinction between these two ideas has fallen by the wayside. Propaganda and political manipulations have contributed to the anti-Semitic beliefs around the world, but Dr. Blackman will contend that these are necessary but not sufficient conditions to produce the vile type of anti-Semitism that is now rampant. We must look at the unconscious dynamics, determine which of these are applicable in any given case, and thereby be able better to combat these powerful irrational forces.

Jerome S. Blackman, M.D., FIPA, is professor of clinical psychiatry at Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk; Training and Supervising Analyst with the Contemporary Freudian Society in Washington DC; Faculty member at the Object Relations Institute in New York, and invited lecturer at Icahn Mt Sinai School of Medicine, New York. He is past Distinguished Professor of Mental Health (2018 – 21) through Harvard – Shanxi Medical University in Taiyuan, China, twice past President of the Virginia Psychoanalytic society, and past President of the American College of psychoanalysts. His honors include the Edith Sabin MD award from the American Psychoanalytic Association. He is the author of five books, including 101 defenses: How the mind shield itself (his first) and Developmental evaluation of children and adolescents: A psychodynamic guide (co-author, 2023).

Daniel Burston: Antisemitism and the Authoritarian Personality (1pm – 2pm EDT, Room 3)

Abstract: In The Authoritarian Personality, Adorno et al. found very high correlations between antisemitism and Right-wing authoritarian personality traits. In fact, Adorno et al. described authoritarianism as a socially patterned defect that is inherently Right wing, and not found among “progressives” – this despite the ravages of Stalinism in that same time period. He was roundly criticized for this oversight by many of his contemporaries. But sadly, recent research on Left- wing authoritarianism has neglected to explore this issue in depth. Nevertheless, we have plenty of data to draw on to see how these phenomena are connected. This presentation explores the similarities and differences between Right- and Left-wing authoritarianisms, the ways in which the “progressive” Left became increasingly authoritarian, and aligned itself with Islamist movements and causes that are authoritarian and antisemitic to the core. It also addresses the ways in which “progressives” – including many Jews, like Judith Butler, and Lara Sheehi’s many Jewish supporters – disclaim any antisemitic feelings or attitudes, hiding them (from themselves and from others) under the veil of principled anti-Zionism.

Daniel Burston, PhD, is a historian of the behavioral sciences with a special. interest the ways psychology, psychiatry and psychoanalysis converge and overlap with religion, philosophy and politics. He taught Psychology at Duquesne University for 30 years and chaired the Psychology department there from 2006-2012. He is the author of numerous books and journal articles including Erik Erikson and the American PsycheEgo Ethics and Evolution (Aronson, 2007) and Antisemitism and Analytical Psychology: Jung, Politics and Culture (Routledge, 2021) More recently, he co-edited Critical Theory and Psychoanalysis: From the Frankfurt School to Contemporary Critique (Routledge, 2022) with Jon Mills.

PANEL: UNDERSTANDING THE UKRAINE WAR
Panelists: Brian D’Agostino (organizer), Ben Abelow, and Inna Rozentsvit (11:10am – 12:10pm EDT, then 1pm – 2pm EDT, Room 1)

Panel Abstract: This panel will examine the different facets of the Russia-Ukraine conflict from three complementary perspectives.

Brian D’Agostino will examine conflicting narratives about the Ukraine war, what caused it, why it continues, and how it can be ended. In one common view, for example, the 24 February 2022 invasion was unprovoked, and the Russian imperialism that motivated it poses an ominous security threat to European and world security. In contrast, the invasion was an act of aggression under international law but was primarily a response to threats to Russia’s own security posed by NATO expansion, and most likely would not have occurred had the US and NATO made peace with Russia in the years following the end of the Cold War. This presentation evaluates such theories considering the available evidence and assesses alternative scenarios for ending the fighting and rebuilding security in the post-war world.

Benjamin Abelow will focus his presentation on debunking false narratives that underlie the war. He will present and discuss evidence that the widespread narrative propagated by Western governments and media, that Russia invaded Ukraine to expand its territory and, in some sense, to reestablish the Russian or Soviet Empire, is incorrect. Correspondingly, he will show that the “NATO-provocation thesis” and related explanations provide the correct understanding of the origins of the war. He will present the view that correctly understanding the origins of the war is essential if we wish to bring the war to an optimal conclusion.

Inna Rozentsvit, originally from the former Soviet Union, and who spent her childhood in Ukraine, then studied medicine in Russia, will bring to this discussion her lived and transgenerational experience of Ukro-Nazism. This topic of Nazism in modern Ukraine is treated as an elephant in the room, and it is avoided by western media, and even dropped from the agenda of negotiations that happened at the beginning of the Russian “special operation” in Ukraine. Some psychohistorical data about the “specialness” of Nazism in Ukraine will be presented, highlighting the fact that although no official Nazi party exists in Ukraine currently, and there is no Fuhrer, Ukro-Nazism is more dangerous than it was in Nazi Germany.

Brian D’Agostino, PhD, is President of the International Psychohistorical Association, and editor of Disarmament Times. He is the author of peer reviewed research in political psychology, numerous articles on psychohistory and public affairs, and The Middle-Class Fights Back: How Progressive Movements Can Restore Democracy in America. Visit his website at https://bdagostino.com/

Benjamin Abelow, M.D., is the author of How the West Brought War to Ukraine: Understanding How U.S. and NATO Policies Led to Crisis, War, and the Risk of Nuclear Catastrophe, which has been translated into seven languages. He previously worked in Washington, DC, on nuclear arms issues. He has a B.A. in European history from the University of Pennsylvania and an M.D. from the Yale School of Medicine, where he also served as Lecturer in Medicine. His other areas of interest include the study of trauma.

Inna Rozentsvit, M.D., PhD, MSciEd, is a physician-neurologist, neurorehabilitation specialist, and educator, trained in psychoanalysis in functional medicine, who is involved in transdisciplinary research, teaching, and publishing. She is the Associate Director of Psychohistory Forum, and an Associate Editor of Clio’s Psyche, a psychohistorical publication. Her psychohistorical research is focusing on transgenerational transmission of trauma and resilience, parenting and parenthood, and introduction of psychoneurobiological lens to study human condition.

PANEL: THE MANY ROADS TO PSYCHOBIOGRAPHY: A MULTIGENERATIONAL PANEL (9am -12:10pm EDT, then 1pm – 3:05 EDT)

Panelists (Morning Session): Inna Rozentsvit (panel organizer), Lentisitse Nkarabeng Mekgwe, Present Raymond Ramalepe, Claude-Hélène Mayer (moderator)

Panelists (Afternoon Session): Kevin Mc Ginnis, Joseph Epstein, Claude-Hélène Mayer (moderator), William McKinley Runyan (discussant)

Inna Rozentsvit: Introduction to the Many Roads to Psychobiography (9am – 10am EDT)

Abstract: Psychobiography is the intensive psychological study of an individual within their unique socio‑cultural‑historic context. There are many roads to psychobiography: some choose a bottom-up approach to looking into lives of the subjects of research, trying to understand how one’s childhood and child-rearing practices influence this person’s personality, inner emotional life, career path, as well as relationships’ patterns. Others use a top-down approach based on psychological theories, as well as personality psychology, sociology, and anthropology. This multigenerational panel includes presenters from various cultural, professional, educational, and geographical backgrounds united by one aim of examining lives of famous individuals through psychological and cultural-social lenses.

Lentisitse Nkarabeng Mekgwe: A psychobiography of a Woman Leader: Winnie Madikizela-Mandela (10:05am – 11:05am EDT)

Abstract: This psychobiography seeks to study Winnie Madikizela-Mandela as a woman leader in South Africa. The study will occur through the authentic leadership model proposed by Klenke (2007). This perspective is utilised to establish an understanding of Winnie’s leadership authenticity in her respective positions and relations to the community she led. The authentic leadership dimensions through which Winnie will be examined includes the self-identity, leader-identity and spiritual-identity systems model proposed by Klenke (2007). These dimensions would elicit Winnie’s leadership authenticity through her self-knowledge and awareness as an individual. The sentiment of this psychobiographical study is to offer a thorough exploration of Winnie’s journey towards her ultimate authenticity and extraordinariness (Mayer et al., 2021) as a woman leader. With the prevalence of several biographies of Winnie, this psychobiographical perspective lends an alternative understanding of her extraordinary, complex, and unique (Mayer et al., 2021; Steinberg, 2023; Maasdorp, 2018; Van Niekerk, 2021) characteristic as a woman leader. The value-add of this study highlights the growing re-emerging attraction to psychobiographical studies, particularly of African women leaders. It likewise seeks echo the invite of psychobiographical perspectives and studies of unique and extraordinary individuals (Mayer et al., 2021; Maasdorp, 2018; Van Niekerk, 2021), particularly individuals, contexts and industries that are not maximally researched.

Lentisitse Nkarabeng Mekgwe, MPhil, is the Industrial Psychology student, South Africa. Affiliation: University of Johannesburg, Department: Industrial Psychology and People Management (IPPM). Research supervisor: Prof Claude-Hélène Mayer. 

Present Raymond Ramalepe: Mamphela Ramphele: A Woman Leader in South Africa (10:05am – 11:05am EDT)

Abstract: Dr. Mamphela Aletta Ramphele, born on December 28, 1947, is a prominent South African figure known for her tireless efforts against apartheid. Her multifaceted roles as an activist, leader, academic, and businesswoman have left a lasting impact on the economy of South Africa. Throughout the apartheid era, Ramphele dedicated herself to fostering societal progress, striving for equality, and fought for total liberation, alongside notable figures such as Steve Biko. However, the authorities employed oppressive laws to disrupt her efforts for liberation. As a result, Ramphele’s leadership style was profoundly shaped by experiences of being subjected to banning orders, enduring suffering, imprisonment, and facing harassment. Hence, this study aims to explore and understand the personal challenges and adversities encountered by Dr. Mamphela Ramphele throughout her life journey, analyzing their significant impact on her career advancement and the unique leadership approach she exhibits. To explore this topic, a psychobiographical study will be conducted, evaluating Ramphele’s life and personal experiences. This review will involve using both primary and secondary methods to collect data, such as autobiographies, biographies, books, and transcripts of interviews from diverse databases. Purposive sampling will be used to select the subject based on her contributions to the South African political arena, academia, and economic development. Content analysis will be employed to analyze data sourced from various communication channels. To ensure the integrity of the study, trustworthiness, and ethical considerations will be maintained throughout the entire research process.

Claude-Hélène Mayer: Insights on Life of Jean-Paul Sartre: New Ideas on Freedom and Human Existence (11:10am – 12:10pm EDT)

Abstract: Jean-Paul Sartre (1905–1980) is considered one of the most important and influential figures of the 20th century in philosophy and political activism. This presentation focuses on his life and work, particularly on his personal development as a philosopher and political activist. A deeper insight into Sartre’s life, philosophy and political thought may provide new ideas on freedom, power and existence for people living today.

Claude-Hélène Mayer is a Professor in Industrial and Organizational Psychology at the Department of Industrial Psychology and People Management at the University of Johannesburg, South Africa. She is a Semester at Sea Alumni (SASFA22) and a Board member of the International Academy of Intercultural Research (IAIR). Claude is a Senior Editor for the Europe`s Journal of Psychology (EJOP), an Associate Editor for Frontiers in Psychology (Positive Psychology) and for the International Journal of Cross-Cultural Management (IJCCM).

She holds Doctoral degrees in Psychology, Management and Cultural Anthropology. Her Venia Legendi is in Psychology with focus on Work, Organizational and Cultural Psychology (Europa Universität Viadrina, Frankfurt (Oder), Germany). Her research areas include transcultural mental health, salutogenesis, transcultural conflict management and mediation, women in leadership, shame and love across cultures, The Fourth Industrial Revolution, and psychobiography.

She is the winner of the William B. Gudykunst Book Award 2023, awarded by the IAIR. Her teaching areas are cross-cultural psychology, mental health, psychobiography, organizational theory, systems and design thinking, coaching, positive psychology, organizational behaviour and transcultural conflict management and mediation. She works as a licenced (Germany) systemic family therapist and facilitator in family therapy (SG), constellation facilitator (KI), mediator and mediation facilitator (BM 2001-2021), hypnotherapist (TIM) and coach in private practice. Since 2005 she consults for leaders and international organizations.

Claude-Hélène Mayer (moderator): Discussion of the Morning Session and Q&A (11:10am – 12:10pm EDT)

Kevin McGinnis: A Psychobiographical Presentation on Suharto and His Role in the Tragic Genocide of East Timor (1pm – 2pm EDT)

Abstract: I intend to present a psychobiography on Suharto, the former authoritarian president of Indonesia. Suharto and his administration are frequently characterized as a military dictatorship and Suharto is responsible for widespread political persecution within Indonesia, as well as the invasion and genocide in East Timor.

Unfortunately, I believe that Sukarno’s regime and the genocide in East Timor is not well-known in the United States of America. This presentation aims to further our knowledge of the genocide in East Timor, Suharto, and his regime, and how to prevent the tragic genocide from occurring again.

Kevin McGinnis, LMSW, is a recent graduate from the New York University School of Social Work and received his Master of Social Work. Presently, he is working on a research study with a group of colleagues led by Dr. Denis O’Keefe, PhD and Dr. Bandy Lee, MD. The study aims to analyze the beliefs of mental health professionals regarding the Goldwater Rule and its application in contemporary medical ethics. Previously, he worked as a therapist in a psychiatric hospital. Additionally, he has presented on public policy issues at the 2021 and 2022 IPhA annual conferences.

Joseph H. Epstein: Reflecting on Psychobiographies of the Nations’ Leaders: Exploring Grievances and Hegemonic Ambitions in U.S.-China Cyber Dynamics (1pm – 2pm EDT)

Abstract: Disruptive technologies historically play a pivotal role in shaping the international order. The 21st century has been characterized by China’s ascent and the emergence of digital technologies. Chinese piracy of U.S. technology, and vice-versa, is a contentious political issue.

The Chinese Communist Party is accused of leveraging an “all-state” approach to espionage, directing, or encouraging the PLA, patriotic hackers, criminal networks, and scholars from universities to conduct widespread cyber espionage and data theft. Chinese government officials vehemently deny allegations of engaging in such activities and instead accuse the U.S. government of cyber espionage, surveillance, and intelligence collection.

Espionage is not a new phenomenon in the political arena, but it is a consequence of fear and historical grievances. Historical grievances, combined with contemporary issues such as the U.S.-China trade dispute, disagreements over Taiwan’s sovereignty, tensions in the South China Sea, Fentanyl, and unresolved financial debts, all influence this great power relationship.

The US-China race for hegemonic supremacy is intensifying during a technology revolution. This presentation explores the relationship between the two governments as it pertains to cyber piracy—distrust and historical disputes, with reflections upon the unique psychobiographies of the nations’ two leaders (Xi Jinping and Donald Trump).

Joseph Healy Epstein, BA (Philosophy), MA in Global Security Studies, with a post-baccalaureate Certificate in Intelligence at Johns Hopkins University (2024), and interested in history, math, behavior dynamics, and cognitive processes. Joseph plans on attending The University of Chicago or NYU next fall to pursue further graduate work in Political/Social Science. He resides in New York, New York, and can be contacted at 

Claude-Hélène Mayer (moderator) and William McKinley Runyan (discussant): Discussion of the Afternoon Session and Q&A (2:05pm – 3:05pm EDT)

NOTE to ALL IPhA MEMBERS: Please note that we will be gathering on Saturday, 6-1-24, at 12:15pm to 12:55pm, for the IPhA’s biennial business meeting, which will include officer reports, election of officers, and Q&A.

5.
MEET OUR INDIVIDUAL AND PANEL PRESENTERS ON SUNRDAY, JUNE 2ND, 2024: THEIR TOPICS, ABSTRACTS, BIOS

On Sunday, June 2nd, besides our two plenary speakers, Sheldon Solomon, you will have an opportunity to meet other speakers and to engage with and contribute to the following individual presentations:

Nina Cerfolio: Adolescent Domestic Mass School Shooting Sprees and the Need for Humane Parenting (9am – 10am EDT, Room 3)

Abstract: This paper explores the psychopathology of adolescent teen mass shooters through the lens of childhood trauma and underscores the need for human parenting especially in those most vulnerable. Rather than dismissing these adolescents as “oddballs” or “loners,” the author provides interpretation and diagnosis. “Soul murder” (Shengold, 1989) – the abuse of children that deprives them of their identity and the ability to feel joy – was experienced by many of these adolescent assailants. Common themes in these adolescent shooters were, significant trauma of emotional, sexual, and physical abuse, frequent dislocations, bullying and marginalization, online radicalization, exposure to firearms, and low socioeconomic status. In part due to the fear of being stigmatized, these adolescent shooters and their families tragically concealed psychotic symptoms from their treating mental health professional. The families ultimately did not secure proper psychiatric treatment even when they knew their child had command auditory hallucinations telling them to kill. Because these adolescents were misdiagnosed and mistreated, their underlying psychotic symptoms were exacerbated to a deadly degree. Many of these individuals were capable of being psychotic, while still having the ability to plan and execute a mass shooting. The devastating effect of the early abuse and neglect on these adolescent shooters underscores the need for more humane parenting. The importance of spirituality as one path to heal from trauma will be discussed.

Nina Cerfolio MD, Assistant Clinical Professor of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, is an internationally recognized expert on trauma and terrorism and a board certified, psychiatrist and psychoanalyst in New York City.  In practice for 30+ years, Nina’s success rests in her unique approach, which integrates traditional psychiatric training with her decades of spiritual training. She has been published in prestigious peer-reviewed journals and presented her original work on the psychological influences of spirituality, trauma, and terrorism nationally and internationally, and featured on numerous TV outlets. Her thought-provoking new book, Psychoanalytic and Spiritual Perspectives on Terrorism: Desire for Destruction (Routledge, 2023), weaves her team’s cutting-edge research with her extraordinary first-hand experiences of being a first responder and unique real-world trajectory to explore a more expansive understanding of the origins of terrorism while highlighting an overlooked spiritual lens as a powerful antidote for healing from trauma.

Jerome Blackman: Superego Variations in Genocidal Leaders: Fanatics vs. Psychopaths (10:05am – 11:05am EDT, Room 3)

Abstract: Based on my previous presentation, “denial of danger throughout history,” in this paper, I will take a deeper look at the type of superego that allows leaders to become genocidal. I plan to examine the belief systems of Hamas, Hezbollah, and their Iranian terror masters, and compare and contrast the value system of leaders such as Vladimir Putin, Idi Amin Dada, and of course, Hitler. There are areas in superego functioning to be found in leaders such as William J., Clinton and Michael Gorbachev.

Bio: Jerome S. Blackman, M.D., FIPA, is professor of clinical psychiatry at Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk; Training and Supervising Analyst with the Contemporary Freudian Society in Washington DC; Faculty member at the Object Relations Institute in New York, and invited lecturer at Icahn Mt Sinai School of Medicine, New York. He is past Distinguished Professor of Mental Health (2018 – 2021) through Harvard – Shanxi Medical University in Taiyuan, China, twice past President of the Virginia Psychoanalytic society, and past President of the American College of psychoanalysts. His honors include the Edith Sabin MD award from the American Psychoanalytic Association. He is the author of five books, including 101 Defenses: How the Mind Shield Itself (his first) and Developmental Evaluation of Children and Adolescents: A Psychodynamic Guide (co-author, 2023).

Brian D’Agostino: Death Anxiety in Our Polarized World: Introduction to Terror Management Theory (1pm – 2pm EDT, Room 2)

Abstract: This presentation reviews key findings of Terror Management Theory (TMT), a body of research in experimental psychology that examines the psychological causes and effects of death anxiety. I apply TMT, which is based on the work of Ernest Becker, to large-group manifestations of death anxiety in our current global civilization. Topics include the role of belief systems in managing death anxiety, direct sources of death imagery (e.g. pandemics, wars), indirect sources (e.g. challenges to belief systems), ideological polarization, and the relationship between death anxiety management and self-esteem.

Brian D’Agostino, PhD, is President of the International Psychohistorical Association. He is the author of peer reviewed research in political psychology, numerous articles on psychohistory and public affairs, and The Middle Class Fights Back: How Progressive Movements Can Restore Democracy in America. Visit his website at https://bdagostino.com/

Also, on Sunday, June 2nd, 2024, we will have the following PANEL PRESENTATIONS:

PSYCHOHISTORY FORUM PANEL: THE THREAT TO AMERICAN AND WORLD DEMOCRACIES IN LIGHT OF THE 2024 US ELECTION (9am – 11:05am EDT, then 1pm – 4:10pm EDT, Room 1)

Panelists: Paul Elovitz (panel organizer), Jeffrey Rubin, Karyne Messina, Charles Strozier, Brigitte Demeure, Anna Geifman, and Krystyna Sanderson

Panel Abstract: In light to the 2024 US election, we should consider that the American Republican Party primary leader is being an individual who tried to overthrow with violence the 2020 election, despite having lost the election by over 7 million votes and 74 electoral college votes. There is considerable concern, especially given former President Trump’s saying he will be dictator for a day. Because the destruction to democracies and threats to them is a worldwide phenomenon, this panel includes collogues from a variety of other countries with eroding democracies. Our goal is to have each presenter to focus on specific as well as general threats from a psycho-political, psychoanalytic and psychohistorical perspectives.

Paul Elovitz: Donald Trump as the Great Emotional Clarifier and the Appeal of Authoritarian Leaders (9am – 10am EDT, Room 1)

Abstract: As a presidential psychobiographer with perhaps ten publications on Trump, my greater focus will be on his appeals to his base as well as to Caucasian Americans of both genders who, in the majority, voted for him in 2016 and 2020. The confusion of the incredible rate of change of modern life and the deliberate obscuring of policy realities by both parties (the Republicans have excelled in this regard), Trump is a great clarifier, which is important for his appeal. This is reflected in current public opinion polls, where Trump surpasses President Biden in popularity despite the current Democratic President’s avoidance of a recession, a healthy economy, beneficial environmental policies and protections of democracy around the world. Millions of voters are terrified by the uncertainties of our modern capitalistic system and Trump’s emotional clarity is reassuring. At the moment, it appears that it is emotion rather than economics that favors the Republican front runner. Also, voters look for their presidents being able to survive all sorts of adversity, and Trump, who has survived two impeachments and is now defiantly facing numerous legal challenges, has this appeal to a significant part of the electorate.

Paul H Elovitz, PhD, is a historically and psychoanalytically trained psychohistorian who has presented at every IPhA conference after being part of the group that planned of the first one Included in his specialties are presidential and psychobiographical psychohistory. In 2023-2024, he was teaching psychobiography online at the postgraduate level, and now, he is teaching a course on creativity, psychoanalysis and psychohistory. This is after a long career of teaching at Temple, Rutgers, and Fairleigh Dickinson universities as well as being a founding professor at Ramapo College, New Jersey, where he taught History, Psychohistory, and interdisciplinary studies for a half century. He is the author of over 400 publications, the founding editor of Clio’s Psyche, and the founder and director/convener of Psychohistory Forum.

Jeffrey Rubin: The ‘Killer’ and the ‘King’: A Psychobiographical Examination of Trump and His Threat to American Democracy (9am – 11:05am EDT, Room 1)

Abstract: In this psychobiographical study of Donald Trump, I draw on Trump’s family, Trump himself, and journalists and reporters, to attempt to link his indictments to his childhood and his parents’ treatment of him. I also briefly explore three other topics: 1) The Real Big Lie—the fact that Trump is terrified that he’s a “Loser”—not that Biden stole the 2020 presidential election; 2) what the available evidence suggests would happen if Trump eludes jail-time and wins the 2024 presidential election—Trump would operate like a dictatorial king; and 3) Trump-as-King would be the culmination of a ghastly trauma—the final hijacking of his soul in his blindly following his father’s injunction to be a killer and a king. At that moment, Trump would have given up his right to a life that should have been his own.

Jeffrey B. Rubin, PhD, practices psychoanalysis and psychoanalytically oriented psychotherapy in New York City and North Salem, NY. The author of six books, he has taught at various psychoanalytic institutes and lectured around the country and abroad on psychoanalysis and psychoanalysis and meditation.

Karyne Messina: Donald Trump and the Fascism Question (10:05am – 11:05am EDT, Room 1)

Abstract: This paper explores whether or not Donald Trump has become a fascist.  In this context, his brand of leadership will be examined to determine if it is reminiscent of fascism exhibited by strongmen of the past or if it fell short of that type of leadership until he incited citizens to rise against our democracy during the insurrection of 2021.  As the parallels between Trump and historical strongmen become more apparent, we must understand the implications of such a power shift, which we also need to consider within a larger conversation about the threat to global democracies within the framework of the 2024 U.S. presidential election.

Karyne E. Messina, Ed.D. FABP, is the author of numerous books on projective identification, a podcast host, a licensed psychologist, and a certified psychoanalyst. She is also the Chair of the Scholarship and Writing section of the Department of Psychoanalytic Education (DPE) which is part of the American Psychoanalytic Association.

After completing her undergraduate studies at Florida Atlantic University, Dr. Messina earned a master’s and a doctoral degree from George Washington University. She completed her post-doctoral training at the Washington School of Psychiatry and the Washington Psychoanalytic Institute. Dr. Messina is currently on the medical staff of Suburban Hospital, which is part of Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Charles Strozier: The Global Threat to Democracy (1pm – 2pm EDT, Room 1)

Abstract: It is easy in the era of Donald Trump to forget that the move toward autocracy is a global phenomenon. Certainly, the three countries with the largest populations have warmly embraced authoritarian rule (China and Russia without apology), while India under Modi drifts right but clings to the trappings of democracy. Even some countries in the EU such as Romania, or several Latin American countries, have drifted toward autocracy. That is our fate, as well, and we need to be aware of and reflect on the dangers.

The wars in the Middle East and Ukraine could easily spin out of control and create what Robert Jay Lifton has called an “atrocity producing situation.” Everything has changed after Hiroshima. Any small and local war has the potential to generate apocalyptic consequences. Putin at the start of his invasion of Ukraine specifically threatened the use of nuclear weapons. He has pulled back from the brink only because he feels, reasonably, he can win the war by playing the long game.

Charles B. Strozier, PhD, is a Professor Emeritus of History, John Jay College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York, where he was also the Founding Director of the Center on Terrorism; and a practicing psychoanalyst. His latest book (with Pinteris, Kelley, and Cher) is The New World of Self: Heinz Kohut’s Transformation of Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy (Oxford). He is also the co-author of The Fundamentalist Mindset (Oxford); and the author of Apocalypse: The Psychology of Fundamentalism in America (Beacon, 1994); Lincoln’s Quest for Union: A Psychological Portrait (Paul Dry Books, 2001; Basic Books, 1982); and many other books, and close to 100 articles.

Brigitte Demeure: The Right-Wing Threat to French Democracy and the Prospects for the June 9th European Election (1pm – 2pm EDT, Room 1)

Abstract: The next European elections of 2024 in France will be held on 9 June 2024 to elect the 81 MEPs representing France in the European Parliament. Across Europe, there is a rise in voting intentions for populist, authoritarian and/or nationalist parties. The aim of this paper is to present a picture of the media and emotional landscape of the French electorate on the eve of these decisive elections for the future of democracy in France but also in Europe.

Brigitte Demeure, PhD, has worked for many years in international trade, but also as a member of the board of various international solidarity NGO’s. She holds a master’s degree in intercultural negotiation, a PhD in history, is a qualified translator and author of the book La figure maternelle dans la vie politique française, 1789-1914 (Editions Universitaires d’Avignon, 2023), and of many psychohistorical articles published in peer-reviewed journals in France, Germany, and the USA. She has received two awards by the ACOPSA (American College of Psychoanalysts) in the USA.

Anna Geifman: The Israeli Struggle to Maintain Their Democracy (2:05pm – 3:05pm EDT, Room 1)

Abstract: The goal of this presentation is to outline—and perhaps initiate a new discussion about—some vital threats to democracy in Israel, the Jewish homeland, struggling to preserve its national character within the parameters of the liberal democratic world order. The argument stems from the opinion that politics are manifest attributes of deeper, ambiguous, many-sided processes.

Political changes represent more profound developments and provide insights for analyzing them. Democracy in Israel is part of the global sociocultural situation, which appears to be at a turning point, uncertain and precarious, as many turning points tend to be. Like elsewhere in the postmodern world, the key threat to democracy is patent confusion about its meaning and purposes. Mental uncertainty translates into oversight and manipulation, contradictory to the democratic system and dangerous for its very essence.

Anna Geifman, PhD, earned her doctoral degree at Harvard University and, is the author of Thou Shalt Kill: Revolutionary Terrorism in Russia, 1894-1917 (Princeton University Press, 1993), Entangled in Terror: The Azef Affair and the Russian Revolution (2000), and Death Will Be Your God:  from Russian Nihilism to Islamist Terrorism (in French, 2005).  She is the editor of Russia under the Last Tsar: Opposition and Subversion, 1894-1917 (Blackwell, 1999).  Her most recent work is Death Orders: The Vanguard of Modern Terrorism in Revolutionary Russia (2010). For over 20 years, Geifman has been Professor of History at Boston University, teaching undergraduate and graduate classes on Russian and Soviet history, modern terrorism, and psychohistory. She also holds a senior research position in the Political Science Department at Bar-Ilan University in Israel.  She can be contacted at .

Krystyna Sanderson: The Polish Struggle for Democracy Against Authoritarianism (2:05pm – 3:05pm EDT, Room 1)

Abstract: The new political situation in Poland after the 2023 election that brought a democratic government after eight years of authoritarian regime will be discussed; how the authoritarian party is attempting to overthrow it, similarly to the attack on the US Capitol.

Krystyna Sanderson, PsyD, LP, is a psychoanalyst in private practice in New York and an instructor at the Psychoanalytic Training Institute. She writes and lectures regularly on topics dealing with psychoanalysis in relation to art, spirituality, and the application of psychoanalytic principles to social and historical phenomena. She is a member of NAAP as well as IPhA.

Conclusion of the Psychohistory Forum Panel: The Threat to American and World Democracies in Light of the 2024 Us Election

Paul Elovitz (Moderator): General discussion and conclusion (3:10pm – 4:10pm EDT, Room 1)

 

IPHA’S TRANSGENERATIONAL TRANSMISSION OF TRAUMA AND PARENTING WORKING GROUP PANEL: PARENTING AND PARENTHOOD THROUGH ATTACHMENT THEORY, TRANSGENERATIONAL TRANSMISSION OF TRAUMA, AND NEUROPSYCHOBIOLOGY LENS (9am – 11:05am EDT, Room 2)

Presenters: Marc-André Cotton, Krystyna Sanderson, Doris Leicher, Inna Rozensvit

Abstract: This presentation will be the product of Transgenerational Transmission of Trauma and Parenting Working Group of the IPhA, which will include 4 presentations. It will cover a wide variety of topics such as:

(1) How Attachment Shapes Our Perception and Expectations (Doris Leicher),

(2) Intergenerational Transmission of Trauma in the Case of a Child of Holocaust Survivor (Krystyna Sanderson),

(3) A Journey from Childhood to Selfhood and Parenthood through the Lens of Neurobiology (Inna Rozentsvit), and

(4) In Switzerland, Childrearing Aimed at National Consent (Marc-André Cotton).

Doris Liecher is a retired LCSW and Modern Psychoanalyst (NCPsyA) with an interest in art from an evolutionary perspective.

Krystyna Sanderson, PsyD, LP, is a psychoanalyst in private practice in New York and an instructor at the Psychoanalytic Training Institute.

Inna Rozentvit, M.D., PhD, MSciEd, is a physician-neurologist and neurorehabilitation specialist trained in psychoanalysis and various trauma-, psychosoma-, and neurodiversity informed practices.

Marc-André Cotton, MA, the International Vice President of the International Psychohistorical Association, an international member of the Psychohistory Forum, and is a teacher and independent scholar.

 

ANTISEMITISM AS JEW-HATRED: A PSYCHOHISTORICAL ENIGMA – PANEL, PART 3 (1pm – 4:10pm EDT, Room 3)

Panel Abstract: Antisemitism as prejudice and discrimination against Jewish individuals and communities, a deeply troubling phenomenon, has existed since ancient times while constantly changing its expressions.

There are 11 panelists presenting in this panel, which spans over three days of the conference. The panelists will attempt to examine the psychoanalytic and psychohistorical contexts of antisemitism, old and new, which is crucial in combating it as well as fostering a more inclusive and tolerant world.

Ian S. Miller: Psychoanalysis, a Defiantly Jewish Science (1pm – 2pm EDT, Room 3)

Abstract: The bizarre term, “Jewish Science” has been applied to only two domains: Einstein’s physics and Freud’s psychoanalysis. The present paper is anchored in examination of a well-known Freudian joke indicative of multiple meanings; and explores its origins in the ambivalently Jewish cultural identity shared by Freud, Heinrich Heine, and Heine’s fictional character “Hirsch- Hyacinth.” The multiple meanings indicative of the joke parallel conflictual aspects of self in oscillation between idealization, derogation, awareness, and dissociation, conditioned by internalization of societal prejudice, traumatization, and the inescapable fact of Jewish identity. In presenting this joke fragment, Freud ticks all the boxes that designate psychoanalysis as “Jewish Science,” defiantly claiming the triumph of this implicit identity, itself originally emergent from societal hatred of Jews both external to psychoanalysis as well as internally, from within psychoanalysis.

Bio: Ian S. Miller, PhD, is a clinical psychologist/psychoanalyst and writer, based in Dublin. He is author of Clinical Spinoza: Integrating His Philosophy with Contemporary Therapeutic Practice (Routledge, 2022); Defining Psychoanalysis: Achieving a Vernacular Expression (Karnac, 2016); On Minding and Being Minded: Experiencing Bion & Beckett (Karnac, 2015); and co-author of Beckett and Bion: The (Im)patient Voice in Psychotherapy and Literature (Karnac, 2013) as well as On the Daily Work of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy (Routledge, 2018). Ian is an Associate Editor of the American Journal of Psychoanalysis.

Jon Mills: The Spectre of Antisemitism in American Psychoanalysis (2:05pm – 3:05pm EDT, Room 3)

Abstract: With the adoption of the decolonial turn in social justice activism, antisemitism has become fashionable in American psychoanalysis. Racial identity politics has all but ruined the American Psychoanalytic Association. With the establishment of the Holmes Commission for Racial Equality, it not only accused all American psychoanalytic institutions of being systemically racist based in white supremacy, but it also demonized Jews, which forced its Jewish president to resign in disgust over the Commissions’ support of a Hamas apologist. Dr. Lara Sheehi’s cult of personality has led to the organizational capture of APA’s Division of Psychoanalysis that proudly advocates for the elimination of Israel as a Jewish state due to its so-called “apartheid settler-colonialism” and “genocide” of the Palestinian people despite suffering the worst pogrom since the Holocaust. The field has lost its way by condoning Jew-hatred and the glorification of terror under the delusion of liberation politics. It will now have to face the consequences.

Jon Mills, PsyD, PhD, ABPP, is a Canadian philosopher, psychoanalyst, and retired clinical psychologist. He is Honorary Professor, Department of Psychosocial & Psychoanalytic Studies, University of Essex, UK; Faculty in the Postgraduate Programs in Psychoanalysis & Psychotherapy, Gordon F. Derner School of Psychology, Adelphi University, USA; Faculty & Supervising Analyst at the New School for Existential Psychoanalysis, USA; and is Emeritus Professor of Psychology & Psychoanalysis at Adler Graduate Professional School, Toronto, Canada where he taught for over 20 years. Recipient of numerous awards for his scholarship, he is the author and/or editor of over 30 books in philosophy, psychoanalysis, psychology, and cultural studies. Dr. Mills is an internationally recognized scholar, teacher, and cultural critic, award winning author who maintains an active writing schedule, and lectures widely worldwide.

Sheila Levi: Antisemitism in Islamist Culture: Prejudices and My Identity (2:05pm – 3:05pm EDT, Room 3)

Abstract: Antisemitism is viewed as a manifestation of narcissism within specific societal constructs. As a Turkish Jew, a descendant of the Jewish families who have escaped from Spain and Portugal, as well as the pogroms in the Russian empire, raised amidst Islamist rhetoric, I explore the influence of this external environment on my identity. The culture that perpetuates antisemitic sentiments in Islamist circles is also notably sexist. Prejudice against Jews and women in patriarchal societies is undeniable. It boils down to an inability to tolerate both tangible and perceived differences. In this presentation, I will provide examples of “covert” antisemitism unearthed during my psychoanalytic work with a Turkish Muslim analysand, a person of apparently modern demeanor.

Sheila Levi, MPhil, MSc, MA, is a child, adolescent, and adult psychotherapist and psychoanalyst.  She is a chartered clinical psychologist as well as a member of the International Psychoanalytic Association, British Psychoanalytic Association, Association of Child Psychotherapists, and British Psychological Society.

Ziva Bracha Gidron: Hope as a Jewish Unique Phenomenon – The Response to the Radical Islamic Antisemitism (3:10pm – 4:10pm EDT, Room 3)

Abstract: On Saturday, October 7th, 2023, Hamas Muslim Arab terrorists attacked Israeli civilians in the most brutal massacre after the holocaust. Over 1,400 Israelis civilians were slaughtered, raped, and abused, with 250 kidnapped to Gaza; among them babies, children, and adults from 9-months to 85 years old.

Those crimes against humanity were perpetuated in the name of the radical Islam whose charter calls for the elimination of the state of Israel. The radical reactions to the massacre brought out loud what was known but well hidden; the awakening of the progressive movements who demonstrate the new version of antisemitism.

It is time for humanity to distinguish between good and evil and decide that this world should be a better place. In Jewish Talmud it is called “Tikun Olam,” the reparation of the world. And a better world includes the struggle against Antisemitism.

Throughout Jewish history, Jews responded to evil through the profound method of Jewish Psychospiritual approach supported by Hope. Hope that is expressed by education, being excellent in all ears of life, and faith in Gd, as well as to transform from times of distress to moments of creativity, elevation, and growth.

The yearning for peace was one of these psychospiritual movements. This was the way Jewish existence expressed the idea of “Carrying Opposites & Unity of Opposites.” This profound Jewish concept is an active one. It means that in all life situations, bad and good, one can interpret as “Oneness” a part of the divine plane helping humanity to contain complexity: wishing for peace together with fighting evil, recognizing despair, and choosing life, all at the same time, Israeli society reflects it in one of the most difficult times since its establishment. It keeps the inner spirit of an entire nation by expressing diversity in a democratic way: in unity, faith, and resilience.

Ziva Bracha Gidron, PsyD, MA, Professional Psychodrama Therapist, professional supervisor, founder, and manager of Hakol Koreh, The Center of the Jerusalem Psychodrama Institute. She is a psychotherapist for individuals and couples and has been a psychodramatist for more than 24 years. Ziva is a senior lecturer in the Israeli educational ministry working with the Crises, Stress, Suicide & Emergency Treatment Unit. She is also a senior lecturer at the Prof. Rotenberg Institute. She integrates Jewish psychology with various psychotherapy methods. Her doctoral thesis in Psychology was on “Unity of opposites” – on creating Hope in Psychodrama Group Psychotherapy, based on the relational approach and the Jewish Hasidic Spiritual Approach.

Daniel Burston (Moderator): General Discussion and Conclusion of the Panel on Antisemitism (3:10pm – 4:10pm EDT, Room 3)

PANEL: UNDERSTANDING RELIGION: PSYCHOHISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES (2:05pm – 4:10pm EDT, Room 2)

Panelists: Marc-Andre Cotton, Doris Leicher, Kenneth Rasmussen, Charles Gourgey

Abstract: The diverse phenomena of religion can be arrayed along a humanist / authoritarian continuum. This classification reflects divergent child-rearing subcultures corresponding to what cognitive linguist George Lakoff called the “nurturing parent” and “strict father” types.  It also helps illuminate the Janus-faced nature of religion, which contributes to egalitarian movements in its humanist variants (e.g. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.) and to reactionary movements in its authoritarian variants (e.g. fundamentalists who voted for Donald Trump). This panel explores these and related themes, drawing upon multiple disciplines including psychoanalysis, history, and biblical studies.

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